Channelpedia

PubMed 18942098


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Cav1.1 , Kv1.4 , Kv3.1 , Kv4.2



Title: Characterization of ion channels in human preadipocytes.

Authors: Hao Hu, Mu-Lan He, Rong Tao, Hai-Ying Sun, Rui Hu, Wei-Jin Zang, Bing-Xiang Yuan, Chu-Pak Lau, Hung-Fat Tse, Gui-Rong Li

Journal, date & volume: J. Cell. Physiol., 2009 Feb , 218, 427-35

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18942098


Abstract
Ion channels participate in regulation of cell proliferation. However, though preadipocyte (the progenitor of fat cell) is a type of highly proliferating cells, ion channel expression and their role in proliferation is not understood in human preadipocytes. The present study was designed to characterize ion channels using whole-cell patch clamp technique, RT-PCR, and Western blotting. It was found that a 4-aminopyridine- (4-AP) sensitive transient outward K(+) current (I(to)) was present in a small population of (32.0%) cells, and an outward "noisy" big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current (I(KCa)) was present in most (92.7%) preadipocytes. The noisy current was inhibited by the big conductance I(KCa) channel blocker paxilline (1 microM), and enhanced by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 (5 microM) and the big conductance I(KCa) channel activator NS1619 (10 microM). RT-PCR and Western blot revealed the molecular identities (i.e., KCa1.1 and Kv4.2) of the functional ionic currents I(KCa) and I(to). Blockade of I(KCa) or I(to) with paxilline or 4-AP reduced preadipocyte proliferation, and similar results were obtained with specific siRNAs targeting to KCa1.1 and Kv4.2. Flow cytometric analysis showed ion channel blockade or knockdown of KCa1.1 or Kv4.2 with specific siRNA increased the cell number of G0/G1 phase. The present study demonstrates for the first time that two types of functional ion channel currents, I(to) and big conductance I(KCa), are present in human preadipocytes and that these two types of ion channels participate in regulating proliferation of human preadipocytes.