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PubMed 21550405


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Cav2.1



Title: Splice isoform-specific suppression of the Cav2.1 variant underlying spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

Authors: Wei-Ling Tsou, Bing-Wen Soong, Henry L Paulson, Edgardo Rodríguez-Lebrón

Journal, date & volume: Neurobiol. Dis., 2011 Sep , 43, 533-42

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21550405


Abstract
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channel subunit (CACNA1A). There is currently no treatment for this debilitating disorder and thus a pressing need to develop preventative therapies. RNA interference (RNAi) has proven effective at halting disease progression in several models of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), including SCA types 1 and 3. However, in SCA6 and other dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorders, RNAi-based strategies that selectively suppress expression of mutant alleles may be required. Using a Ca(V)2.1 mini-gene reporter system, we found that pathogenic CAG expansions in Ca(V)2.1 enhance splicing activity at the 3'end of the transcript, leading to a CAG repeat length-dependent increase in the levels of a polyQ-encoding Ca(V)2.1 mRNA splice isoform and the resultant disease protein. Taking advantage of this molecular phenomenon, we developed a novel splice isoform-specific (SIS)-RNAi strategy that selectively targets the polyQ-encoding Ca(V)2.1 splice variant. Selective suppression of transiently expressed and endogenous polyQ-encoding Ca(V)2.1 splice variants was achieved in a variety of cell-based models including a human neuronal cell line, using a new artificial miRNA-like delivery system. Moreover, the efficacy of gene silencing correlated with effective intracellular recognition and processing of SIS-RNAi miRNA mimics. These results lend support to the preclinical development of SIS-RNAi as a potential therapy for SCA6 and other dominantly inherited diseases.