Channelpedia

PubMed 9520461


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: ClvC2 , ClvC4



Title: Analysis of ClC-2 channels as an alternative pathway for chloride conduction in cystic fibrosis airway cells.

Authors: E M Schwiebert, L P Cid-Soto, D Stafford, M Carter, C J Blaisdell, P L Zeitlin, W B Guggino, G R Cutting

Journal, date & volume: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 1998 Mar 31 , 95, 3879-84

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9520461


Abstract
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal inherited disease that results from abnormal chloride conduction in epithelial tissues. ClC-2 chloride channels are expressed in epithelia affected by CF and may provide a key "alternative" target for pharmacotherapy of this disease. To explore this possibility, the expression level of ClC-2 channels was genetically manipulated in airway epithelial cells derived from a cystic fibrosis patient (IB3-1). Whole-cell patch-clamp analysis of cells overexpressing ClC-2 identified hyperpolarization-activated Cl- currents (HACCs) that displayed time- and voltage-dependent activation, and an inwardly rectifying steady-state current-voltage relationship. Reduction of extracellular pH to 5.0 caused significant increases in HACCs in overexpressing cells, and the appearance of robust currents in parental IB3-1 cells. IB3-1 cells stably transfected with the antisense ClC-2 cDNA showed reduced expression of ClC-2 compared with parental cells by Western blotting, and a significant reduction in the magnitude of pH-dependent HACCs. To determine whether changes in extracellular pH alone could initiate chloride transport via ClC-2 channels, we performed 36Cl- efflux studies on overexpressing cells and cells with endogenous expression of ClC-2. Acidic extracellular pH increased 36Cl- efflux rates in both cell types, although the ClC-2 overexpressing cells had significantly greater chloride conduction and a longer duration of efflux than the parental cells. Compounds that exploit the pH mechanism of activating endogenous ClC-2 channels may provide a pharmacologic option for increasing chloride conductance in the airways of CF patients.