Channelpedia

PubMed 23884930


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Kir2.3



Title: Developmental changes in structural and functional properties of hippocampal AMPARs parallels the emergence of deliberative spatial navigation in juvenile rats.

Authors: Margaret G Blair, Nhu N-Q Nguyen, Sarah H Albani, Matthew M L'Etoile, Marina M Andrawis, Leanna M Owen, Rodrigo F Oliveira, Matthew W Johnson, Dianna L Purvis, Erin M Sanders, Emily T Stoneham, Huaying Xu, Theodore C Dumas

Journal, date & volume: J. Neurosci., 2013 Jul 24 , 33, 12218-28

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23884930


Abstract
The neural mechanisms that support the late postnatal development of spatial navigation are currently unknown. We investigated this in rats and found that an increase in the duration of AMPAR-mediated synaptic responses in the hippocampus was related to the emergence of spatial navigation. More specifically, spontaneous alternation rate, a behavioral indicator of hippocampal integrity, increased at the end of the third postnatal week in association with increases in AMPAR response duration at SC-CA1 synapses and synaptically driven postsynaptic discharge of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Pharmacological prolongation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in juveniles increased the spontaneous alternation rate and CA1 postsynaptic discharge and reduced the threshold for the induction of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity at SC-CA1 synapses. A decrease in GluA1 and increases in GluA3 subunit and transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein (TARP) expression at the end of the third postnatal week provide a molecular explanation for the increase in AMPAR response duration and reduced efficacy of AMPAR modulators with increasing age. A shift in the composition of AMPARs and increased association with AMPAR protein complex accessory proteins at the end of the third postnatal week likely "turns on" the hippocampus by increasing AMPAR response duration and postsynaptic excitability and reducing the threshold for activity-dependent synaptic potentiation.