Channelpedia

PubMed 22187434


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: TRP , TRPV , TRPV4



Title: Axonal neuropathy-associated TRPV4 regulates neurotrophic factor-derived axonal growth.

Authors: Yongwoo Jang, Jooyoung Jung, Hyungsup Kim, Jungeun Oh, Ji Hyun Jeon, Saewoon Jung, Kyung-Tai Kim, Hawon Cho, Dong-Jin Yang, Sung Min Kim, In-Beom Kim, Mi-Ryoung Song, Uhtaek Oh

Journal, date & volume: J. Biol. Chem., 2012 Feb 17 , 287, 6014-24

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22187434


Abstract
Spinal muscular atrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by the degenerations of peripheral motor and sensory nerves. Recent advances in genetics have resulted in the identification of missense mutations in TRPV4 in patients with these hereditary neuropathies. Neurodegeneration caused by Ca(2+) overload due to the gain-of-function mutation of TRPV4 was suggested as the molecular mechanism for the neuropathies. Despite the importance of TRPV4 mutations in causing neuropathies, the precise role of TRPV4 in the sensory/motor neurons is unknown. Here, we report that TRPV4 mediates neurotrophic factor-derived neuritogenesis in developing peripheral neurons. TRPV4 was found to be highly expressed in sensory and spinal motor neurons in early development as well as in the adult, and the overexpression or chemical activation of TRPV4 was found to promote neuritogenesis in sensory neurons as well as PC12 cells, whereas its knockdown and pharmacologic inhibition had the opposite effect. More importantly, nerve growth factor or cAMP treatment up-regulated the expression of phospholipase A(2) and TRPV4. Neurotrophic factor-derived neuritogenesis appears to be regulated by the phospholipase A(2)-mediated TRPV4 pathway. These findings show that TRPV4 mediates neurotrophic factor-induced neuritogenesis in developing peripheral nerves. Because neurotrophic factors are essential for the maintenance of peripheral nerves, these findings suggest that aberrant TRPV4 activity may lead to some types of pathology of sensory and motor nerves.