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PubMed 20837139


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Kv10.1



Title: Identification of polycystin-1 and Gα12 binding regions necessary for regulation of apoptosis.

Authors: Wanfeng Yu, Benjamin J Ritchie, Xuefeng Su, Jing Zhou, Thomas E Meigs, Bradley M Denker

Journal, date & volume: Cell. Signal., 2011 Jan , 23, 213-21

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20837139


Abstract
Most patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) harbor mutations in PKD1, the gene for polycystin-1 (PC1), a transmembrane protein with a cytoplasmic C-terminus that interacts with numerous signaling molecules, including Gα12. The functions of PC1 and the mechanisms of cyst development leading to renal failure are complex. Recently, we reported that PC1 expression levels modulate activity of Gα12-stimulated apoptosis (Yu et al., J. Biol. Chem. 2010 285(14):10243-51). Herein, a mutational analysis of Gα12 and PC1 was undertaken to identify regions required for their interaction and ability to modulate apoptosis. A set of Gα12 mutations with systematic replacement of six amino acids with NAAIRS was tested for binding to the PC1 C-terminus in GST pulldowns. Additionally, a series of deletions within the PC1 C-terminus was examined for binding to Gα12. We identified 3 NAAIRS substitutions in Gα12 that completely abrogated binding, and identified a previously described 74 amino acid Gαi/o binding domain in the PC1 C-terminus as necessary for Gα12 interaction. The functional consequences of uncoupling PC1/Gα12 binding were studied in apoptosis assays utilizing HEK293 cells with inducible PC1 overexpression. Gα12 mutants deficient in PC1 binding were refractory to PC1 inhibition of Gα12-stimulated apoptosis. Likewise, deletion of the Gα12-interacting sequence from the PC1 cytoplasmic domain abrogated its inhibition of Gα12-stimulated apoptosis. Based on the crystal structure of Gα12, the PC1 interaction sites are likely to reside on exposed regions within the G protein helical domain. These structural details should facilitate the design of reagents to uncouple PC1/Gα12 signaling in ADPKD.