Channelpedia

PubMed 12920200


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Cav1.2



Title: Adenosine-A2a receptor down-regulates cerebral smooth muscle L-type Ca2+ channel activity via protein tyrosine phosphatase, not cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

Authors: Katrina Murphy, Volodymyr Gerzanich, Hui Zhou, Svetlana Ivanova, Yafeng Dong, Gloria Hoffman, G Alexander West, H Richard Winn, J Marc Simard

Journal, date & volume: Mol. Pharmacol., 2003 Sep , 64, 640-9

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12920200


Abstract
Adenosine acting via A2a receptors (A2aR) is a potent cerebral vasodilator that relaxes vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by a mechanism attributed to activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAK). We examined effects of adenosine and its mechanism of action on L-type Ca2+ channels in native VSMCs from rat basilar artery. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence imaging confirmed transcription and expression of A2aR, and in situ hybridization confirmed presence of mRNA for L-type Cav1.2b channels. In patch-clamp experiments, adenosine down-regulated Ca2+ channel currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with receptor-subtype-specific antagonists [4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo-[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM-241385) versus 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine] showing that this was caused by action of A2aR. Down-regulation of channel currents was mimicked by stimulation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK; 8-Br-cGMP) and by inhibition of tyrosine kinase (AG-18) but not by stimulation of cAK [forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-AMP)]. Down-regulation of currents by the A2aR agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyeth yl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethyolcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680) was blocked by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP; orthovanodate and dephostatin), but not by inhibiting cGK (KT-5823 and H-7). Western blots of lysate or of immunoisolated Ca2+ channels from arterial segments incubated with CGS-21680 showed 1) increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein that was blocked by inhibiting cAK (KT-5720), consistent with activation of cAK by A2aR; and 2) decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of immunoisolated alpha1c subunit of the Ca2+ channel. Our data show that cAK, although activated, was not germane to down-regulation of Ca2+ channel activity by A2aR, and they delineate a novel signaling mechanism involving reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of Ca2+ channels by A2aR probably caused by PTP activation.