Channelpedia

PubMed 20558140


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Nav1.5



Title: Functional dominant-negative mutation of sodium channel subunit gene SCN3B associated with atrial fibrillation in a Chinese GeneID population.

Authors: Pengyun Wang, Qinbo Yang, Xiaofen Wu, Yanzong Yang, Lisong Shi, Chuchu Wang, Gang Wu, Yunlong Xia, Bo Yang, Rongfeng Zhang, Chengqi Xu, Xiang Cheng, Sisi Li, Yuanyuan Zhao, Fenfen Fu, Yuhua Liao, Fang Fang, Qiuyun Chen, Xin Tu, Qing K Wang

Journal, date & volume: Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2010 Jul 16 , 398, 98-104

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20558140


Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the clinic, and accounts for more than 15% of strokes. Mutations in cardiac sodium channel alpha, beta1 and beta2 subunit genes (SCN5A, SCN1B, and SCN2B) have been identified in AF patients. We hypothesize that mutations in the sodium channel beta3 subunit gene SCN3B are also associated with AF. To test this hypothesis, we carried out a large scale sequencing analysis of all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of SCN3B in 477 AF patients (28.5% lone AF) from the GeneID Chinese Han population. A novel A130V mutation was identified in a 46-year-old patient with lone AF, and the mutation was absent in 500 controls. Mutation A130V dramatically decreased the cardiac sodium current density when expressed in HEK293/Na(v)1.5 stable cell line, but did not have significant effect on kinetics of activation, inactivation, and channel recovery from inactivation. When co-expressed with wild type SCN3B, the A130V mutant SCN3B negated the function of wild type SCN3B, suggesting that A130V acts by a dominant negative mechanism. Western blot analysis with biotinylated plasma membrane protein extracts revealed that A130V did not affect cell surface expression of Na(v)1.5 or SCN3B, suggesting that mutant A130V SCN3B may not inhibit sodium channel trafficking, instead may affect conduction of sodium ions due to its malfunction as an integral component of the channel complex. This study identifies the first AF-associated mutation in SCN3B, and suggests that mutations in SCN3B may be a new pathogenic cause of AF.