Channelpedia

PubMed 19188705


Referenced in Channelpedia wiki pages of: none

Automatically associated channels: Kv1.4 , Kv11.1



Title: Genomic imbalances in key ion channel genes and telomere shortening in sudden cardiac death victims.

Authors: B Banerjee, D N Peiris, S H Koo, P Chui, E J D Lee, M P Hande

Journal, date & volume: Cytogenet. Genome Res., 2008 , 122, 350-5

PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19188705


Abstract
Sudden cardiac death (SCD) can be caused by a number of reasons. Previous works have identified the genetic causes, such as alterations in the DNA sequence, for many of these diseases. We hypothesize that some patients may show genomic imbalances and changes in the gene copy number leading to genetic instability. To clarify this, we analysed DNA samples from SCD victims using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a molecular cytogenetic technique that permits the genome-wide screening of chromosomal imbalances, and telomere length measurement. DNA derived from peripheral blood and heart tissue of 14 SCD cases and six apparently healthy control individuals were subjected to CGH analysis. Telomere length measurements were done by the Southern blotting method. Eight out of 14 SCD cases exhibited changes in DNA/gene copy number. CGH analysis showed variation in the gene copy number of some of the genes associated with potassium (KCNAB1, KCNH2, and KCNA4) and calcium (RyR2, ATP2A2) ions which are involved in maintaining the ionic balance of the heart. Alterations in TERC and TERT genes were also detected in SCD victims. In nine SCD victims shorter telomeres were detected. This might have resulted from excessive cellular proliferation and/or oxidative stress in these individuals. Copy number changes observed and telomere shortening detected in SCD cases would possibly explain at least some of the causes of SCD at early ages in humans. Identification of biomarkers of SCD is of great importance and thus the present study will facilitate the identification of some of the biomarkers.