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Contribution of delayed rectifier potassium currents to the electrical activity of murine colonic smooth muscle.

S D Koh, S M Ward, G M Dick, A Epperson, H P Bonner, K M Sanders, B Horowitz, J L Kenyon

J. Physiol. (Lond.), 1999 Mar 1 , 515 ( Pt 2), 475-87

1. We used intracellular microelectrodes to record the membrane potential (Vm) of intact murine colonic smooth muscle. Electrical activity consisted of spike complexes separated by quiescent periods (Vm approximately -60 mV). The spike complexes consisted of about a dozen action potentials of approximately 30 mV amplitude. Tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1-10 mM) had little effect on the quiescent periods but increased the amplitude of the action potential spikes. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, >= 5 mM) caused continuous spiking. 2. Voltage clamp of isolated myocytes identified delayed rectifier K+ currents that activated rapidly (time to half-maximum current, 11.5 ms at 0 mV) and inactivated in two phases (tauf = 96 ms, taus = 1.5 s at 0 mV). The half-activation voltage of the permeability was -27 mV, with significant activation at -50 mV. 3. TEA (10 mM) reduced the outward current at potentials positive to 0 mV. 4-AP (5 mM) reduced the early current but increased outward current at later times (100-500 ms) consistent with block of resting channels relieved by depolarization. 4-AP inhibited outward current at potentials negative to -20 mV, potentials where TEA had no effect. 4. Qualitative PCR amplification of mRNA identified transcripts encoding delayed rectifier K+ channel subunits Kv1.6, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and the Kvbeta1.1 subunit in murine colon myocytes. mRNA encoding Kv 1.4 was not detected. 5. We find that TEA-sensitive delayed rectifier currents are important determinants of action potential amplitude but not rhythmicity. Delayed rectifier currents sensitive to 4-AP are important determinants of rhythmicity but not action potential amplitude.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10050014